Author: Michael - page 4

BRAHMI – Bacopa monniera

Wet

The Brahmi herb is a spreading perennial reaching 7.5cm high. This herb loves constantly moist conditions so it will happily grow in shallow water or boggy sites. Needs moderate fertilising.

Medicinal uses: There is some evidence that Brahmi will improve memory. Take 3 sprigs 10cm long twice a day. The sprigs may be added to a sandwich or made into tea and sweetened if required. Brahmi tea has a pleasant taste similar to Chinese green tea and it can be combined with this. 

BERGAMOT OSWEGO TEA – Monarda didyma

Wet

bergamot20flower1Spreading herbaceous perennial to a height of 90cm. Beautiful butterfly attracting scarlet red flowers during summer. Use fresh or dried leaves and flowers in herbal tea. Taste similar to marjoram in flavour with hint of orange, producing an earl grey flavour.

Medicinal uses: Beneficial for minor digestive complaints and lowering fever.

BAY TREE – Laurus nobilis

Fertilise

Aromatic, slow-growing tree to 10-20 m high, but often grown in containers which will reduce height. Prefers full sun. Frost hardy to -7degrees C. Formal plant for containers, hedges, topiary standards.
Bay leaves are used as flavouring in soups, stews, sauces and in bouquet garni.

BASIL THAI – Ocimum basilicum ‘Anise’

Fertilise

An annual basil reaching 75cm high. Frost tender. It requires the same conditions as that of Sweet Basil. An attractive basil with purple stems and small leaves which have a spicy aniseed aroma with hints of mint. Used in Thai and Vietnamese dishes, it holds its flavour well when cooked.

BASIL SWEET- Ocimum basilicum

Fertilise

An annual growing 30-80cm tall. Ideal pot plant, but also happy in the herb garden. Prefers full sun to partial shade. Frost and cold sensitive. Fresh leaves can be used in salads, vegetable and meat dishes. Keep centres pinched to promote bushier plant and inhibit flowering. Well known for its addition to Italian dishes and pesto. Delicious clove and aniseed flavours.

BASIL SACRED/HOLY – Ocimum tenuiflorum, O.sanctum

Fertilise

An annual basil reaching 50cm. Frost tender. Holy basil has a very rich history and is considered a sacred plant by the Hindus. It requires the same conditions as ‘Sweet Basil’. The flowers are highly fragrant and hint of cloves and cinnamon. Add leaves sparingly to salads.

Medicinal uses: Holy Basil is said to have powerful antioxidant properties as well as being anti-fungal, anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory. It may help with certain conditions including stress, indigestion, inflammation and colds to name a few. It is used in Ayurvedic medicine, but the scientific evidence to back up the claims is scarce and mostly anecdotal. Holy Basil should not be consumed when pregnant, have bleeding disorders or about to have surgery.

BASIL ‘RED RUBIN’ – Ocimum ‘Red Rubin’

Fertelise

An annual basil with reddish-purple leaves to 40cm high. Frost tender. It is a stronger tasting basil than the sweet but likes the same conditions as the Sweet Basil. As the leaves turn green when cooked, it is best used fresh as a garnish. It is the best flavoured purple leaf basil.

BASIL ‘PURPLE RUFFLES’ – Ocimum ‘Purple Ruffles’

Fertelise

An annual basil reaching 70cm. Frost tender. This basil has striking frilly leafed purple foliage so it makes a great contrast plant in the herb garden. Prefers a protected position in the full sun or partial shade. It has Sweet Basil and cinnamon flavoured leaves and makes an interesting addition to a salad or stir fry.

BASIL PERRENIAL – Ocimum spp

Fertelise

A perennial form of basil reaching 120cm high. Hardy to light frost. Prefers a position in the full sun to partial shade with winter warmth. It can be used in the same dishes as sweet basil but it has more of a cinnamon overtone to the flavour. Prune back in summer if needed.

BASIL BUSH – Ocimum minimum

Fertilise

A bushy annual plant reaching 50cm high. Frost tender. Leaves have cinnamon, clove and aniseed aromas. It has a milder flavour than Sweet Basil but can be used in the same dishes as sweet basil. Due to its compact size it is ideal for pots.

ASPARAGUS – Asparagus officinalis

Fertilise

Perennial with creeping rhizomes growing up to 1.4m. Frost tolerant. Plant dies down each winter to produce new shoots in spring. Prefers a deep well-drained and manured soil. Young shoots/spears appear in spring and can crop for 3 months. It is best not to pick the spears for the first couple of years so the plant can develop a strong root system. Once established plants can live up to 20 years. Asparagus can be steamed, blanched, roasted, fried or are even delicious raw.

ARTICHOKE GLOBE – Cynara scolymus

Fertilise

Clump forming perennial with deeply cut grey/green leaves which can grow to 1m or more in a sunny position. Frost hardy. Plants will bear fruit for 3-4 years after which they should be divided and replanted.

Culinary uses: Pick unopened flower heads when still tight and tender. These can be boiled, baked, fried or marinated. 

Medicinal uses: Said to repair damaged liver cells and aid poor digestion.

ARTHRITIS HERB ‘GOTU KOLA’ – Centella asiatica

Wet

Spreading evergreen perennial to a height of 10cm. Frost Hardy. Likes a boggy spot with some shade so is great to plant around ponds. They can be quite bitter especially if grown in the sun so you can add to a sandwich or salad each day, or in soups or curries.

Medicinal uses: Take 1 or 2 40cm leaves daily to aid in the temporary relief of arthritis. Edible in small amounts only. Always consult with your medical practitioner.

Aloe Vera – Aloe vera

Dry

Non-edible. Succulent perennial which grows to about 60cm both high and wide. Prefers full sun and good drainage. Growth will be slower if plant kept indoors. Not frost tolerant. Said to be have been used in herbal medicine for 5000 years.

Medicinal uses: The juice of the leaves can be applied directly to the skin to help relieve pain of burns, sunburn and insect bites.

Franz Waldemar Heyne (Wally)

(1913 -2003) – 3RD GENERATION

WallyHeyne 01Franz Waldemar Heyne (whom was affectionly known as Wally) was born at Summertown on the 10th of May 1913; his parents were Carl Franz Heyne and Wilhelmina Carolina Dorothea (Minnie) nee Lehmann.
He was baptised on the 6th of June 1913 and confirmed on the 8th of Dec 1929 by Pastor Janzow in Bethlehem Lutheran Church, Adelaide.
As a child, Wally lived in Summertown, a small town in the Adelaide Hills, South Australia. The house was a stone building with 4 main rooms and an extra room of galvanised iron where Wally and older brother Mike slept, later they were joined by their ageing and forgetful grand-father Lehman Heyne.

1924 The family moved from Summertown to a suburb east of Adelaide, Kensington. The address was originally 41 Parade East, Kensington but was changed to 41 The Parade, Beulah Park, the site of the present Garden Centre. There was no toilet in the house. The lavatory, with no connected sewerage was a long distance from the house and needed special attention. A bucket was placed through a door behind the back of the lavatory and was regularly emptied. The contents were then buried in a hole somewhere in the back yard.

High School Wally attended Norwood Boy’s High School where he soon made a name for himself beating boys twice his size in cross-country races. He always said that he had an edge over the city boys because he had spent the previous years running up and down the hills around Summertown. Football was very popular in the hills area, and Wally remained a keen supporter of the game all through his life.

1929 Wally left school at 16 and started work at the Beulah Park Nursery. Wally drove a horse and cart (pulled by Topsy the horse) with brother Mike, selling plants around the suburbs for two years, at first not selling more than 10 shillings worth a day.

1931– When Wally turned 18 years of age a new Chevrolet truck was bought, enabling the door to door selling of plants in the country to begin, continuing for 10 years. The truck was loaded on Sunday, would leave on Monday and return on Thursday. The truck was designed with a 2 berth sleeping cabin and made regular trips to Victor Harbour, Port Augusta, Quorn and Mallala.

1939, September the 9th Wally married Vera Jean Goodfellow in the Summertown Methodist Church. Vera’s father ran a deli in Summertown in what used to be the old Mt. Lofty Hotel. Vera had been his childhood sweetheart. Wally liked to tell his family and friends that as a child, Vera used to chase him around singing “Wally Heyne puts dripping on his hair”. Their courtship must have been difficult due to the distance that they lived apart. One Sunday, Wally had to ride his push bike from Beulah Park to Summertown just to let Vera know that he couldn’t come for dinner that evening. During the early years of his marriage, Wally drove to country fairs on weekends to sell plants.

Wally and Vera ‘propagated’ three children the eldest, Glen followed by Roger and then Garry. Vera ran a very popular florist shop making wreaths and floral arrangements, her reputation becoming such that people would come from miles around to have her designs. Youngest son Garry was kept in a giant wooden box (containing toys) in the room while Vera was working.

Wally would leave very early in the morning to go into the Adelaide Market and collect cut flowers, arriving back at the florist shop at the break of day. On the weekends at the Beulah Park Garden Centre, Vera baked hot scones and heated milk mixed with cocoa on a wood stove for staff to drink on cold winter days. When the florist shop on The Parade was closed down Vera would do the same during the weekdays for the staff. Many clients learnt the times of the day when Vera made her famous, delicious, large hot scones and would hang around the back door of the homestead and hint for a plate of scones. Fresh scalded cream made on top of the wooden stove, with home-made Blackberry jam was added to the scones. With the smell of the scones and hot cocoa it was no wonder people would gather!

Wally was a hardworking man, as were his fore-fathers before him and the success of the business was entirely due to Wally and Vera Heyne’s dedication to building a better future for their children. Of his three sons, Glen started working in the business after he completed his time at Norwood High School and then left the business in his early years to pursue another career. After finishing school Roger and Garry both started working in the family nursery business.

You can still see some of the paving and concrete block (used for plant bed walls) laid by Wally Heyne, which he made during the night after the nursery was closed. A globe was tied to a stake and used to light the area where he was laying concrete paths.

Wally would mix concrete and fill wooden boxes with it after dinner in the back yard. Same as the paths, an extension cord was laid out with an electric globe connected on the end. Then early next morning he would pull the boxes apart to remove the concrete blocks. He would then nail the boxes back together again and coat the inside with old engine sump oil. This made it easy to remove the blocks and stop damage to the corners. Wally made hundreds of them.

WALLY’S SPECIAL TIMES.1939 Wally
Times were hard and many people suffered hardships including Wally and Vera. The hours were long and the workload was never ending from daybreak to late at night.
The nursery was a safe house for the children around the local area. They were told that if anything went wrong they were to rush over to the nursery and ask for Mr Heyne (Wally) for safety and protection. Each fireworks season, Wally would ask the poor families near the nursery to come and watch his firework display.

During the Second World War, Wally could not join the armed services because he was blind in one eye. With his brother Ern and his brothers-in-law Bill and Syd taken as P.O.W.’s he was determined to do his bit for the war effort so he took up a position working the night shift at The British Tube Mills making casings for bullets. In true “Wally Heyne” fashion he threw himself into the task, exceeding quotas and earning himself the nickname “Tear Arse Heyne” from the other workers. He ran the nursery during the day and went hawking plants in the country in a Chevrolet Buckboard (ute) on weekends. Later he used a truck.

Wally and South Adelaide Football Club
Wally loved all sports and was a keen one-eyed Panther supporter. His interest began when he was 5 years old. He became a great fan of Arnie Caust, a South Adelaide player who lived in Summertown. Wally joined the Club in 1935 and Vera soon became every bit as involved as he was. Wally had a wealth of stories to tell about some of the characters he had met over the years. He had especially great memories of 1964, the year the Panthers won their last premiership. He kept a bottle of Peter Darley red wine which he said wasn’t to be opened until South Adelaide won their next premiership.

Wally was honoured with life membership with the SAFC in 1971 and became patron in 1973, a position he held until 1997. The club chairman at the time, Stuart Palmer, paid tribute to Wally’s 20+ years as patron, mentioning particularly the great debt of gratitude the club owed him for his generosity in many areas, the provision of employment, and the fact that he was the club’s number 1 supporter.
He and Vera made many dear, life-long friends through the South Adelaide Football Club.

A reference in a South Adelaide Football Club newsletter from the early 1980’s of Wally at the traditional club picnic at Happy Valley arriving in the last hours of the day, after closing the nursery, with tray loads of pies and pasties and ‘turning on a selling performance that will make necessary the complete rewriting of all marketing text books.’
There followed a poem:

Wally the Flying Pieman
He spends each day at the garden shop Amid roses and flora and phlox, But on a Sunday in September each year, Comes Wally’s call for all to hear: ‘Get your meat pies here, nice and hot! Have ’em with sauce, or have ’em with not.
It’s damned easier work than running a plot!’ Cries Wally the Flying Pieman.

DIGGING SEEDLINGS.
Due to the Nursery early opening times, bundles of seedling plants (which are now grown and sold in plastic punnets) needed to be prepared well before the early morning. This meant that during the winter months it was cold, windy, wet and quite dark when preparation began.

Keeping the Coke Glass House Boiler stoked during the cold nights was a tiring task for him as it was attended approx. every 2 hours. The morning commenced each day with a starting time before six o’clock with the first task being to remove staples from the middle of Woman’s Weekly magazines. These magazines were then torn in half and put into heaps, two pages were selected and the left side the top corner was folded down. These sheets were then placed on a new heap where they would be used to wrap around freshly dug seedlings.

Seedlings were dug out of the ground from seedling beds. Young plants were clumped together in moulded bundles of approximately twenty seedlings per bundle. They were then wrapped with the folded magazine pages and placed onto the paths between the seedling beds.

The bundles of seedlings were later collected and placed into wooden boxes which would be submerged into a water tank until the air bubbles stopped rising. This was conducted to make sure every part of the plants soil was wet.
Summertime was enjoyable to feel the cool water on our hands, but during the Autumn and Winter months it was a different sensation. Some years when we experienced a dry winter the ice had to be broken off the top of the water in the dip tank before using.

MOUNT LOFTY PROPERTY.
The property was situated between Mount Lofty and Mount Bonython with the rear of the property facing Sprigg Road and the front boundary bordered by the main road leading to Mount Lofty. Cleland Reserve entrance is opposite the original house which has been renovated and added to, years after Wally sold the property.

Wally Heyne bought 24 acres of land to start a production nursery. When he acquired the land it had areas containing tall trees on the flanks of the boundary, with the main central area covered with age old tangled, matted blackberry bushes mixed with small dead trees and shrubs.

The only water supply came from a tunnel up near the old house which had been dug by the original owners many years before. The tunnel had been excavated into the side of the hill and proceeded through the side of a well which is near the side of the road on the property. It then continued under the main road to the other side. The original owners were trying to find the natural spring which fed Waterfall Gully Creek.

Wally first cleared the wild scrub away from the entrance, built a low walling to hold back the water which was running out of the entrance. He then placed a small pipe to feed the water away from the main entrance. The reason for this was to explore the tunnel so with the aid of kerosene lamps we travelled (in the first week of buying the property) into the tunnel to see how far it went. We encountered many snakes whilst in the tunnel.
Wally’s next approach was to clean the wild scrub from the house and renovate it so a caretaker could live on the property. The house had been neglected for many years and the only occupants living in the house were, you guessed it, SNAKES!!

The whole property was a nightmare and I often wondered how mum and dad could had ever seen a future in this steep hilled property covered with wild scrub mixed with tangled wild thorny blackberries. For anyone who has never experienced this, the best way to describe the bushes is:- masses of waving branches covered with tiny thorns that break off and become embedded in your flesh. Trying to remove them during the day was impossible due to the size and colour of them. Every time you tried to dig out the Blackberry bushes by the roots the bush next to them would lash out and grab you like an octopus.

Building the road through the centre of the property.
This was a test of willpower, strength, blood, sweat and tears for Wally. Wally employed two men to help him widen a walking track which followed the side of the hill and met into the second gully. At the centre of the property he hired a local bulldozer to cut out a platform to house a large shed. Later part of the gully opposite the shed was filled with rubbish and topped with rubble to form an area for the trucks to turn around. The following year the road was extended to the bottom of the second gully in preparation for the water storage area.

The following year sections of the second gully were cleared and fenced to keep the local rabbits out. One of the main problems was that the rabbits ring barked the young fruit trees that had been budded. I can remember my first years working at the Mount Lofty nursery on my hands and knees following behind dad, wrapping the tape around the fresh buds he had just inserted onto the trees. When the hot weather continued, we would take of our shirts to try and keep cool, but the March flies would attack us by the hundreds and leave large, stinging welts on us that would last for days.

Early morning and sunset were the best time to shoot rabbits. There were always plenty of rabbits to give away to customers who visited the Beulah Park Nursery and lots of stew and rabbit pies for the boys which were cooked by Vera on the old kitchen wood stove.

The Dam
A dam was built a few years later, at the bottom of the where the two gullies met. During some extreme cold mornings the dam would ice over to a depth of 1cm and Wally would have to break the ice and wade into the water and tap the pump pipe to get the pipe water moving. Later a bore was sunk at the top near the main road and a second next to the dam which was to be used as a backup if the first one failed. The bore near the main road gave more water at a shallow depth so this was used first. A pipe was connected from the tunnel water supply near the house to the dam.

Vera Heyne died of cancer at the age of 55 years.
Wally and Vera were devoted to each other and their family. They worked side by side in the nursery and there was always a welcome mat out at their home for relatives and friends.
When Vera died Wally lost the love of his life.

Wally Heyne: Until the age of 84, Wally liked to keep an eye on the Retail and Wholesale Nurseries and visited them every weekday. For the last 2 years of his life Wally resided at Clearview Manor being cared for by Robyn and the caring staff. He enjoyed weekly luncheon outings and regular visits from family and friends. A favourite pastime was playing cards and usually winning!!!

Wally Heyne 89 years of age passed away on February 27th 2003.

Carl Franz Heyne

(2ND GENERATION)

CarlHeyne 01BORN :- January 1st 1869 ————— DIED :- September 18th 1948
As a boy Carl attended Prince Alfred College.

He then qualified from Roseworthy Agricultural College.
1899 – James Potter was taken in as a partner in the Rundle St. shop. The shops’ name was changed to ‘Heyne, Potter & Co.’.
1902 – Married Wilhelmina Caroline Dorethea (Minnie) Lehman.
1904 – The partnership ceased, but the business continued for a while under the same name, opposite York Hotel in Rundle St. It was later sold, and a stand opened at the market.
1911 – Carl leased a 10 acre property at Summertown on Greenhill Rd, as an extension of the nursery. His growing family moved there to live. Because he used to work in town, and later at the Norwood Nursery, he stayed the week with his mother at Bond St. Norwood, and drove the horse and cart back up to the hills to re-join his family for the weekend.

Carl packeted and sold seeds in country areas just prior to World War 1. He also sold seeds and cut flowers from the Central Market on Fridays and Saturdays until about 1912. White flowers were best sellers, as back then it was customary to put only white flowers on graves. After this, the business was run from 47 William St. Norwood. Carl concentrated on selling bulbs and packing seeds for wholesale to shops.

World War 1 –
As the name Heyne is German of origin, he suffered much animosity. Once a month, a Lutheran Minister used to visit for a service at the Heyne’s residence and another nearby family of German origin.
The locals claimed they were conducting German spy meetings and harassed them so much that they discontinued the services. One day a local policeman visited Carl and apologetically explained that he had to examine the large Blue Gum out the front of the house as the locals claimed it hid a wireless for sending and receiving German spy messages! There was nothing found.

CARL and WILHELMINA’S Children
They are listed in order from the eldest son. Ernst Bernhard, Anna Margaretha Dorothea, Laura Wilhelmina, Heinrich Carl, Thusnelda Gertrude Agnes, Dora Elfrieda Minna, Franz Waldemar, Lesley Ida, Ida Erica Frieda and Isobel Joy.
Carl’s children were also harassed and taunted at school for being German descendants. The business was badly effected during the war, largely because of the German name.
He tried operating a motor bus service from Uraidla to Adelaide. He bought a second hand Russel truck. All soldiers in uniform were carried free. As many Uraidla children used to pass the family home on their way to school, Carl would give the first 20 a free ride. At the same time, he worked as a gardener for many of the wealthy Adelaide families.

1915 – 1928CarlHeyne 02
Business was conducted from Norwood and at the property in Summertown. Carl was a heavy pipe smoker and a couple of puffs were enough to quieten the bees. If he was travelling along the road and saw a swarm of bees ahead, he would take off his shirt, tie the top with the sleeves, and put them inside. He also kept pigs, and the boys would trap rabbits for the evening meal, sometimes to sell to neighbours.
Goats were also kept. The kids (goats) were for the dinner table (even though many at the time would not eat such meat), and the older goats were harnessed to the boys’ cart that they used to collect firewood both for themselves and to sell to neighbours.

Carl’s wife, Minnie, used to go fruit picking to earn money for the Christmas presents for the children.

1928 – Selected and developed the site at 41 East Parade, Beulah Park, now known as 287 The Parade – the site of the present day nursery. At first he sold mainly seeds and seedlings.
1931– The lease had run out on the Summertown property, and the family moved back down to the plains to live in Kensington.
1936 – The Beulah Park nursery was now operating as ‘Carl F. Heyne & Son’, Franz Waldemar Heyne (known as Wally) having joined his father in the business. Carl started selling a comprehensive range of trees, shrubs and climbers, as well as seeds.

The business was again affected by anti-German sentiment just before and during World War 2, despite brothers and other relatives being volunteers in the Allied Forces.
1947 – The nursery became known as ‘Kensington Nurseries’. Carl Franz Heyne died
in 1948.

Ernst Bernard Heyne

BOTANIST AND HORTICULTURIST

(1825 – 1881) – 1ST GENERATION ( in AUSTRALIA)

ErnstHeyne 01E.B. Heyne was born at Meissen, Saxony, Germany on September 15th, 1825; son of Carl August Heyne, Doctor of Medicine and his wife, Marianne, daughter of Caroline and Johannes Tierof. He was educated at Leipzig University Germany, where he received in 1845 his Diploma of Botany. He was an accomplished linguist and mathematician. E.B. obtained a position at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Dresden.

He was appointed to lead a botanical expedition into Spain. However, this was cancelled owing to political troubles at the time…
E.B. Heyne’s brother Carl was involved in politics in Hamburg. He shot and killed a military officer in a duel and was obliged to flee to America.
Although not implicated, E.B. Heyne decided to emigrate.

1848 He left Hamburg on 2nd October on the sailing ship ‘Godefroi’ and accompanied a family to Victoria as a tutor.

1849 E.B. Heyne arrived in Melbourne, Australia.
His journey and arrival in Australia are described in a series of letters he wrote. They were published (in German) and included detailed observations of the climate, soil, vegetation, water supplies, economy of the country, the habits of the colonists as well as excellent advice to prospective migrants, much of which is still relevant. After the death of her husband, Dr Carl Heyne, Marianne founded a school in Dresden. In 1851, accompanied by her daughter Agnes, she migrated to Victoria to join her son, and there continued to do educational work. A century and three generations later the family is still closely linked with education, medicine, horticulture, mathematics and the teaching of languages.

1854 -E.B. Heyne was employed as Chief Plantsman and Draftsman at The Melbourne Botanic Gardens. E.B. drew one of the earliest designs under the directions of Dr Von Mueller for the layout of the Botanical Gardens (A copy is held at the Beulah Park Garden Centre)
When Von Mueller became Director E.B. Heyne was appointed his secretary and he accompanied him on a number of his Victorian expeditions. He assisted in the classification of much of the botanical material that was collected by Von Mueller during the 1850’s.

1868 – E.B. Heyne travelled to South Australia on a plant collecting expedition. He was credited for making a collection of the ‘Tree Fern’ – Dicksonia Antarctica – in its natural habitat, possibly the last collected in the Mt. Lofty Ranges.1869 House

1869 – He came to live in Adelaide and bought property at 96 Sydenham Rd. Norwood. Married Laura Hancke. He established a nursery at Bond St. Norwood. This joined the rear end of 96 Sydenham Rd. Norwood.

He also bought Pise settlers cottage at 47 Williams Street, Norwood which was owned by Edward Hanckel the father of his wife, Laura.

1870 – Established a new shop at 168 Rundle Street

1871 – His book ‘The Amateur Gardener for South Australia’ was published. “The Fruit, Flower and Vegetable Garden” was also published and eventually ran into four editions. It was the first of its kind in South Australia.
Commemorated by Aster heynei F. Meull. and Cyperus ornatus heynei.
He was the secretary at the Vigneron’s Club which, in 1876 presented him with a gold watch as a tribute to his work with the wine industry.
During the 1870s he also contributed articles to local papers and in particular the ‘South Australian Register’. He raised plants at the Norwood premises to sell in the Rundle Street shop.

1874 – Naturalisation. Ernst Bernhard Heyne

1881 – Sold business to Messrs Wertheimer & Seessle. The Rundle Street business continued to trade under the title of E.B. Heyne & Co. and was run the same way he did at the same address (168 Rundle Street).

1882 – The first ‘list’ or catalogue was issued as a supplement to ‘The Garden and The Field Journal’, May 1882 and in the name E.B. Heyne & Co.

1886 – A special catalogue of Bulbs and Tubers, sold by E.B. Heyne & Co. was issued by L. Wertheimer and F. Seessle as a supplement to ‘The Garden and The Field’
(March 1 1886) the address given as 180 Rundle Street, Adelaide.
The business continued under Heyne and Co. until the end of the century.

ErnstHeyne 021887 – ADELAIDE JUBILEE INTERNATIONAL FIRST ORDER OF MERIT awarded to E.B.Heyne and Co. for the Book on Gardening. (A copy is held at the Beulah Park Garden Centre)
Ernst Bernhard Heyne, although continuing to work tirelessly, became ill with asthma and nearly blind he died on October 16th, 1881 aged 56 (in Norwood, South Australia).
Ernst Heyne (E.B.) was a sincere Christian, an adherent of the Evangelical Lutheran Church. His ‘Rueckblick’, written in German, deals with the installation of Pastor Matthias Goethe, it describes the arrival of migrant ships, and refers to Lutheran services in the house of Mr. Morrison, a Congregational Minister. Though serious minded, E.B. Heyne was a cheerful and sociable man with many friends.
He delighted in conversation. He was a prodigious writer, working at his desk till late at night. Though over-shadowed by the great von Mueller, his botanical and horticultural work was a considerable contribution to the early development of these settlements.
He was survived by his wife Laura, 3 daughters and a son, Carl.
After her husband’s death the Heyne family kept the Norwood Nursery on Sydenham Road and Laura continued to run the nursery.
The Heyne family retained their premises at Sydenham Road, Norwood, and in 1899 E.B. Heyne’s son, Carl F. Heyne, joined with James A. Potter in a partnership titled Heyne, Potter & Co.

1904 – The partnership ceased although the business continued under the name of Heyne, Potter & Co. The business was conducted from premises opposite the York Hotel in Rundle Street, Adelaide.
From 1904 the Heynes concentrated most of their business in the Norwood area and Carl Heyne also operated from the Central market until about 1915.

Succulents

Adenium

Adenium obesum is commonly known as the ‘Desert Rose’. It usually grows around 1m tall in a domestic environment and makes an excellent specimen for bonsai. Leaf drop can be common after drought or frost. Eye-catching flowers form in late spring through to autumn.


Adromischus

Adromischus cristatus, commonly known as the ‘Crinkle Leaf Plant’, is a small (rarely exceeding 15cm) succulent which prefers part sun to part shade and protection from frost. This species will send up a small flower spike during spring.


Aeonium

P2091008r

Aeonium is a genus of around 35 species and many cultivars, all forming succulent rosettes on stems. A spear of yellow or white flowers forms in spring. They will tolerate both sun and shade positions; however they will need protection from the hot afternoon sun until they have acclimatised and will usually only tolerate light frost. Listed below are some of the more commonly found


Aeoniums:

‘Blushing Beauty’ – Leaves are red-bronze at the tips and green in the centre, usually less than 80cm in height.

‘Cyclops’ – Forms large heads which are bronze at the tips and green in the centre, usually less than 1m in height.

‘Chocolate Rose’ – Dark burgundy leaves with a touch of green in the centre, usually less than 50cm in height.

‘The Green Rose’ – Green-leaved Aeonium, usually less than 80cm in height.

‘Schwarzkopf’/ ‘Black Rose’/ ‘Black Beauty’ – Deep burgundy, almost black leaves with a touch of green in the centre, up to 1m in height.

‘Short Black’ – Deep crimson to black leaves, compact, usually around 60cm in height.

‘Sunburst’ – Colourful, variegated leaves with a hint of pink, usually less than 50cm tall.

‘Suncup’ – Variegated leaves, small growing, usually less than 30cm in height.

‘Velour’ – Burgundy leaves with a touch of green in the centre, usually around 50cm in height.

A. tabuliforme – ‘Saucer Plant’ or ‘Dinner Plate Plant’, a green, flat growing species which can reach 45cm in diameter.


 Agave

Agave is a genus of around 225 species. They grow in a full sun to part shade position and some species will need protection from frost. Listed below are some of the more commonly found species:

A. attenuate – This species forms rosettes of blue-green, fleshy leaves atop stems which typically grow to around 1.5m tall.

A. geminiflora – The ‘Twin-Flowered Agave’ has narrow, dark green leaves and usually grows no bigger than 80cm in height.

A. ferdinandi-regis – The ‘King Ferdinand Agave’ or ‘King Agave’ is a small growing species (usually around 45cm) which forms a rosette of rigid, dark green foliage with prominent white streaks.

A. victoriae reginae –The ‘Queen Victoria Agave’, ‘Royal Agave’, or ‘Century Plant’ typically reaches approximately 50cm in height and forms a rosette of rigid, dark green foliage with prominent white streaks.

A. tequilana – The ‘Blue Agave’ (popularly known as the base ingredient for tequila) has distinctive blue foliage and typically gets to around 1.5 metres tall in a domestic environment.


Aloe

Aloe is a genus of around 550 species. Most aloes form a rosette of fleshy leaves and prominent flower spikes and generally require full sun to part shade. Listed below are some of the more commonly found species:

A. vera – Commonly known for the medicinal uses of this species, Aloe vera grows to around 1m in height in a natural environment but can also serve happily as a houseplant. It prefers a sunny position, but will need protection from the hot afternoon sun and protection from frost.  Orange flower spikes form in spring and summer.

A. aculeata – This species typically grows to around 60cm tall and is covered in small spines. Flower spikes of yellow, red and orange form in summer. Protection from frost is required.

A. x alworthia ‘Black Gem’ – A hybrid of Aloe and Haworthia, this small growing (usually around 10cm tall), densely clumping plant will be greener when grown in the shade and green to almost bronze/black when grown in the sun.

A. arborescens – The ‘Candelabra Aloe’ can reach up to 3m in height when fully grown, with vibrant red-orange flower spikes in winter. The leaves are serrated and often blue-green in colour.

A. dorotheae – The ‘Sunset Aloe’ is a clumping species which reaches approximately 30cm in height. The leaves will turn a brilliant orange when grown in the sun and will be green with white speckles when grown in the shade. Red flower spikes form in spring and summer.

A. barberae – The ‘Tree Aloe’ reaches approximately 15m in height in nature, bearing red-orange flower spikes in winter when mature. It will need protection from frost.

A. humilis var. echina – Commonly known as ‘Croc Jaws’, this small (usually less than 20cm) species forms red-orange flower spikes in spring and summer and will need protection from frost.

A. deltoideodonta ‘Delta Lights’ – A distinctively variegated hybrid which usually grows to around 45cm tall.

A. juvenna – The ‘Dainty Aloe’ or ‘Tiger Tooth Aloe’ is a small (typically less than 30cm tall) species which is greener when grown in the shade and red-bronze when grown in the sun. It will need protection from frost. Red-orange flower spikes form in summer to early autumn, though flowering can be infrequent.

A. spinosissima – The ‘Spider Aloe’ can reach approximately 90cm in height and has long leaves with small teeth along the margins. Red-orange flower spikes form in winter.


Ceropegia

succulent planted

Ceropegia woodii (commonly known as ‘Chain of Hearts’ or ‘Rosary Vine’) is a trailing succulent ideal for hanging baskets which has mottled, heart shaped leaves and distinctive flowers. Each vine typically reaches approximately 90cm in length. This plant will need protection from the hot afternoon sun.


Cotyledon

C. ladismithiensis – Commonly known as ‘Bear’s Paws’, this species typically grows to around 20cm and requires a sunny or partly shaded position. It will need protection from frost. Yellow-orange bell shaped flowers form in spring.

C. macrantha – Commonly known as the ‘Paddle Plant’, this species will grow to around 90cm in height and prefers a sunny to partly shaded position, however it will need protection from the hot afternoon sun. Orange to red flowers appear in winter.

C. orbiculata – Commonly known as ‘Pig’s Ear’, this species usually reaches around 1m in height when mature and comes in a green or blue-grey leaved form. Red-orange flowers appear in summer. It prefers the full sun and will tolerate moderate frost. Common cultivars of this species include ‘Silver Waves’, which has distinctive rippled foliage, and ‘Delight’, which is a smaller growing form (usually around 40cm).


Crassula

Crassula is a large genus of around 300 species which range in size, habit, appearance and growing conditions. Listed below are some of the more commonly found species:

C. anomala – This groundcover species grows well in full sun or partly shaded positions. The densely clustered foliage is green with burgundy tips. Tiny white flowers appear in spring.

C. arborescens – Commonly known as the ‘Silver Dollar’ plant or ‘Silver Jade’, this species displays silver, rounded foliage with red margins and prefers a full sun to partly shaded position. Clusters of white, star-shaped flowers appear in late spring and summer.

C. arborescens undulatifolia – Commonly known as ‘Rippled Jade’, this species has green to blue-grey foliage with red, rippled edges. It does best in a sunny to partly shaded position and will need protection from frost.

C. capitella – Sometimes known as ‘Campfire Plant’, this species displays small, pointed, brightly coloured leaves of green and red colouring. It rarely exceeds 30cm in height and grows best in a full sun or partly shaded position with protection from frost. Small white flowers appear between the foliage during the summer.

C. erosula – Usually sold as ‘Campfire’, this brightly coloured succulent displays foliage of bright green, yellow, orange and red, becoming more vivid in winter. It grows well in full sun to part shade. White flowers will appear from late autumn and into spring.

C. muscosa – This succulent displays feathery green foliage of small, densely packed leaves and typically reaches approximately 45cm in height. Small white flowers appear between the leaves in both summer and winter. It prefers a partly shaded position.

C. ovata – Generally known as ‘Jade’, ‘Giant Jade’, ‘Friendship Tree’, ‘Lucky Plant’, and ‘Money Tree’, this commonly grown species features thick stems with rounded foliage which is green with red edges, particularly vibrant when grown in the sun. A mass of pink-white flowers will form at the beginning of spring. It prefers a full sun to partly shaded position.

C. ovata ‘Bluebird’ – Also known as the ‘Blue Jade’, this plant has rounded blue-grey foliage with red margins and typically grows to around 30cm in height and 45cm wide. It will grow in full sun to full shade and tolerates light frost. White flowers appear in winter.

C. ovata ‘Gollum’, ‘Hobbit’ – Also known as ‘Green Coral’, ‘Baby Toes’, ‘Trumpet Jade’ and ‘Hobbit’s Pipe’, this cultivar has uniquely shaped leaves which are green with red, concave tips. Thick trunks form with maturity, making it a popular bonsai specimen. It generally grows to around 90cm in height and 60cm wide and forms pink-white flowers in late autumn and early winter.

C. ovata ‘Hummel’s Sunset’ – Sometimes known as the ‘Golden Jade’, this shrubby succulent bares a similar resemblance to the original C. ovata form, however it displays brightly coloured foliage of green, yellow and red. It will grow well in a full sun to fully shaded position and develops pink-white flowers in late autumn and throughout winter. Protection from frost is required.

C. ovata variegata – This variegated form displays ivory white and green striped foliage which can develop a red blush along the margins when grown in the sun. Pink-white flowers appear from spring to the end of autumn. It can grow up to 1m in height and prefers a full sun to partly shaded position.

C. perforata – This dainty species forms triangular blue-green leaves with red edges. It typically grows to around 30cm tall and wide and develops white flowers in spring and summer. A full sun to partly shaded position is preferred, needing protection from the hot afternoon sun. C. perforata variegata is the variegated form.

C. pyramidalis – This species displays interesting foliage of thin, triangular, tightly pressed leaves which form quadrangular columns. The leaves are emerald green and develop a red-purple blush at the tips when grown in the sun.

C. sarmentosa variegata – This species displays pointed leaves which are green with broad, creamy yellow margins which often develop a pink blush. It does best in a full sun to partly shaded position and forms pink-white flowers in summer to early winter.

C. ‘Spring Time’ – This small growing species typically gets to a height of around 15cm and displays thick, dark green leaves with a silvery sheen. Dense clusters of pink flowers form during winter and spring. It prefers a position of full sun or part shade.

C. tetragona – This species displays dark green, elongated leaves and does best in a full sun to partly shaded position. It usually grows to around 60cm tall and makes a good specimen for bonsai. White flowers develop in spring and early summer.


 Echeveria

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The genus Echeveria is host to multiple cultivars presenting fleshy rosettes of different colours, sizes, leaf shapes and growing habits, making it a popular plant for succulent collectors. Listed below are some of the more commonly found species and cultivars:

E. ‘Afterglow’ – The incandescent foliage of this species displays lavender to pink colouring, forming rosettes which are around 30cm in diameter. Red-orange flowers form in summer. It grows best in a sunny to partly shaded position and will need protection from the hot afternoon sun.

E. albicans – This clumping species displays densely packed rosettes of blue-grey foliage, usually just over 10cm in diameter. Coral pink and yellow flowers develop in spring. It is tolerant of frost and prefers a full sun to partly shaded position with protection from the hot afternoon sun.

E. ‘Black Prince’ – This clumping succulent features distinctive rosettes of dark brown to black leaves with green in the centre. Red flower spikes form in autumn and winter. It will tolerate full sun to full shade.

E. derenbergii – This species produces multiple offsets, forming a clump of grey-blue rosettes which are 5-10cm in diameter. Flower spikes of red-orange and yellow bloom in spring. It will tolerate both sun and full shade.

E. ‘Doris Taylor’ – Sometimes referred to as ‘Wooly Rose’, this succulent forms a white fuzz over pale green foliage and occasionally develops a red blush at the tips of the leaves. It will need protection from frost and grows well in a sunny to partly shaded position. Orange and yellow flowers form on spikes during the summer.

E. elegans – Commonly known as the ‘Mexican Snow Ball’, this species displays blue-grey, fleshy rosettes which are densely packed to form a mound. Bright pink and yellow flowers form on stems during winter and spring. It grows best in a full sun to partly shaded position.

E. ‘Emerald Ripple’ – This species features low growing clumps of emerald green foliage. Orange flowers on stems may form during spring, summer and autumn. A full sun or partly shaded position is required.

E. ‘Fanfare’ – The delicate, elongated leaves of this species are a pale green-grey. It prefers a partly shaded position. It forms orange-yellow flowers.

E. glauca – Known widely as ‘Blue Hen and Chicks’, this species offsets profusely to form a mound of flat, blue rosettes. It prefers a sunny to partly shaded position and will need protection from frost. Yellow flowers appear on stems during summer and autumn.

E. ‘Golden Glow’ – This cultivar is usually solitary, producing offsets with age. It is recognised for the golden green foliage it displays, which develops pink blushes along the margins when grown in the sun. It will tolerate full sun to full shade and is tolerant of frost.

E. gibbiflora – This species is the parent plant to many cultivars such as ‘Mauna Loa’ and ‘Perle Von Nurnberg’. It displays eye-catching foliage which is blue-green in the centre and pink-red closer to the edges. It will grow in full sun to full shade.

E. halbingeri – This clumping succulent forms many small, densely packed rosettes of grey-green foliage, displaying blushes of pink around the tips of the leaves. It will tolerate a full sun to full shade position and develops coral flower stems with yellow flowers from the middle of spring to the middle of autumn.

E. ‘Mauna Loa’ – This cultivar is often solitary and develops a stem over time. It forms a large rosette up to 60cm in diameter which is blue-green in the centre and pink-purple around the rippled edges. It does best in a full sun to partly shaded position but will need protection from the hot afternoon sun. It will tolerate light frost. Purple flower spikes form in autumn and winter with pink-orange flowers.

E. pallida – This species forms loose rosettes of pale lime green leaves which often develop a pink blush at the edges. It grows best in full sun to part shade and displays pink flower stems during winter.

E. ‘Perle Von Nurnberg’ – This cultivar displays pearly lavender rosettes which are usually around 15-20cm in diameter. Coral flowers appear on stems during spring and summer. It prefers sunny or partly shaded positions but some protection from the hot afternoon sun may be required. This plant tolerates light frost.

E. ‘Raindrops’ – This usually solitary cultivar features blue-green foliage with pink-red edges, forming a single raindrop-like growth in the centre of each leaf which develop with age. It prefers a sunny or lightly shaded position and requires protection from frost.

E. subsessilis – This succulent forms rosettes of blue-grey foliage with bright pink margins around the leaves, particularly noticeable when grown in a sunny position. Pink-orange flowers form on stems from spring to autumn. It grows best in a full sun to partly shaded position and will need protection from frost.

E. runyonii ‘Topsy Turvy’ – This unique cultivar features grey-blue foliage which is keel-shaped, with the leaf tips pointing towards the centre of the plant. Red and orange flowers appear on stems in late summer and autumn. It will tolerate a full sun to full shade position with protection from the hot afternoon sun.


Euphorbia

Euphorbia is a large and diverse genus of around 2,000 species which exhibit varying life cycles, growth habits, colours shapes and sizes. Some species fall into the category of succulents. Listed below are some of the more commonly found of those species:

E. aeruginosa – This branching species features blue-green, quadrangular stems with red thorns which appear all over the plant. It typically only grows to around 30cm and prefers a partly shaded position. Yellow flowers are prolific in late spring.

E. ferox – This species forms branches from the lower part of the plant and features long thorns which are red at first, turning dark purple and eventually to grey over time, contrasting well over the green stems. It will take on a burgundy hue during the colder months and put on small green leaves in summer. This plant prefers a sunny to partly shaded position, with protection from frost and the hot afternoon sun. Yellow flowers form in spring.

terrariumE. horrida – This species forms branches from the lower part of the plant and features long thorns which are red at first, turning brown over time. Yellow flowers bloom in summer. It will tolerate full sun to part shade but will need protection from the hot afternoon sun.

E. milii – Commonly known as ‘Crown of Thorns’, this species is the parent to many hybrids, such as ‘Lipstick’ which has large leaves and large flowers, ‘Sanoma’ which has large leaves and small flowers, and the dwarf E. milii which has small leaves and small flowers. They feature spiny grey-brown stems which become a leafy shrub, with small yellow flowers housed by petal-like bracts, available in a variety of colours. These can appear throughout the year, particularly prolific in summer. These plants will tolerate full sun to part shade, with protection from the hot afternoon sun until acclimatised.

E. pentagona – This branching species forms green columns with red spines which turn brown over time. It also forms small green leaves which are early deciduous. It is tolerant of light frost and grows well in a sunny to partly shaded position but will need protection from the hot afternoon sun. Dark red and purple cyathia form at the top of the plant.

E. pugniformis – Sometimes referred to as ‘Medusa’s Head’, this uniquely shaped species displays rows of upright green stems which branch from a thick caudex. It forms small green leaves and yellow cyathia, usually atop the central new growth, during spring. It prefers a sunny to partly shaded position, with protection from the hot afternoon sun until acclimatised. An equally unusual cristate form is also available, E. pugniformis cristata.

E. tirucalli – Known under a variety of common names such as ‘Firesticks’,‘Firestick Plant’, ‘Sticks on Fire’, ‘Milk Bush’ and ‘Pencil Tree’, this spectacular species features branches of long, thin stems which can show colours of green, yellow, orange, pink and red (particularly when grown in the sun). It will grow in full sun to part shade. Red and yellow cyathia form in late spring and summer.

E. trigona – Commonly known as the ‘African Milk Tree’, this branching species tolerates full sun to part shade and needs protection from frost. The spiny green stems feature white striations and small green leaves. E. trigona rubra is another form which displays burgundy colouring on both the leaves and stems.


Faucaria

F. felina tuberculosa is a low-growing, clumping succulent which displays fleshy, triangular, green leaves with white tubercules and tooth-like growth along the margins (giving it common names like ‘Tiger Jaws’ and ‘Knobby Jaws’). Yellow flowers appear in autumn. It will grow in full sun to part shade.


Fenestraria

Fenestraria aurantiaca is commonly known as ‘Baby Toes’, referring to the clumping, upright habit of the blue-green, finger-like leaves. Each leaf has a translucent window at the tip to allow sunlight in. It prefers a sunny position and requires protection from frost. Yellow or white flowers appear in spring.


Gasteria

G. batesiana – Often referred to as ‘Ox Tongue’, this species features dark green, thick, rough leaves with white, mottled cross bands made up of small tubercules. A red hue develops when grown in the sun. A pink and yellow inflorescence forms during spring. It will grow best in a sunny or partly shaded position, with protection from the hot afternoon sun.

G. pillansii – This species forms leaves in two opposite rows, which are long and dark green with mottled white markings. A yellow and pink-red inflorescence forms periodically in spring and summer. It prefers a sunny to partly shaded position.


Graptopetalum

G. pentandrum subsp. superbumforms flat rosettes which are a powdery grey-lavender colour, each rosette reaching approximately 10-15cm in diameter. It will tolerate a full sun or shaded position and is tolerant of frost. Branching spikes of interesting flowers appear in winter and spring, which are star-like in shape with a white centre dotted with red marks and finished with red tips.


Graptoveria

Graptoveria are a group of hybrid crosses between Graptopetalum and Echeveria which typically developclusters of fleshy rosettes. Listed below are some of the more commonly found cultivars:

G. ‘Acaulis’ – This cultivar displays a blue-green centre with pink at the tips of the leaves which becomes deeper in colour during winter. It prefers a sunny to partly shaded position and develops cream flowers which appear on spikes in spring.

G. ‘Darley Sunshine’ – This cultivar displays green leaves with red along the margins, forming a clump of rosettes. It prefers a sunny or partly shaded position and will need protection from frost.

G. ‘Debbi’ – This cultivar features stunning lavender leaves, with each rosette reaching approximately 15cm in diameter. It grows best in a sunny to partly shaded position. Purple-pink flowers form on spikes from late winter to early summer.

G. ‘Tricolour’ – This cultivar features thick, densely packed rosettes of grey to powdery purple leaves which occasionally blush with pink, eventually forming a clump approximately 20-30cm in height. It prefers a full sun to partly shaded position.


 Haworthia

H. attenuata – Commonly sold as ‘Zebra Plant’, this species displays dark green clumping rosettes of upright, pointed leaves which are horizontally striped with bands of white tubercules. Cream coloured flowers appear on spikes at any time of the year. It prefers a full to part shade position. This species is often confused with the similar looking H. fasciata, which has wider leaves and less conspicuous tubercules.

H. cooperi – The foliage of this species is mostly green featuring blushes of maroon and is very translucent towards the fibrous leaf tips. It forms densely packed rosettes to create a mound. White flowers appear on spikes during spring and summer. A sunny to partly shaded position is preferred, with protection from the hot afternoon sun and frost.

H. cymbiformis – This species forms clumps of fleshy green rosettes which feature translucent striations along the leaves. It prefers a full to partly shaded position. White flowers appear on spikes throughout the year, particularly in spring and early summer.

H. mirabilis – This species forms clumps of thick green rosettes which feature vertical translucent striations along the leaves and small, tooth-like growths along the margins. The colour changes to a dark brown, purple-red colour when grown in the sun. They prefer a lightly shaded position and will form a small white inflorescence.

H. retusa ‘Grey Ghost’ – This cultivar features pale green leaves with white striations and translucent tips. The rosettes are typically 15cm in diameter and form many offsets. Dainty white flowers form in spring. They require full to partial shade.


Hoya

succents

There are around 200 species of Hoya, commonly known as ‘Waxplant’ or ‘Waxflower’. They are typically vine-like creepers, with succulent leaves and clusters of spectacular flowers, which can be grown on a support or in a hanging basket. Listed below are some of the more commonly found species and cultivars:

H. carnosa compacta – Usually referred to as ‘Indian Rope’, this species features tightly packed leaves which curl towards the vine. It prefers a sunny to partially shaded position. Clusters of pink and red fragrant flowers bloom from spring to early autumn. A variegated form is also available, H. carnosa compacta variegata.

H. heuschkeliana – This specieshas oval shaped leaves which are lighter green on the underside, developing a red hue when grown in the sun. Clusters of small, urn-shaped flowers appear throughout the year when growing conditions are right, which are scented and come in pink, yellow or burgundy. H. heuschkeliana variegata is the variegated form.

H. kerrii – Often sold as ‘Sweetheart Plant’ or ‘Valentine Hoya’ due to the heart-shaped leaves, this species produces scented clusters of star-shaped white flowers with a dark red centre. It prefers a sunny to partly shaded position and requires protection from frost. A variegated form is also available, H. kerrii albomarginata.

H. lauterbachii – Commonly known as the ‘Giant Wax Plant’, this species develops some of the largest of the Hoya flowers, forming a large, scented cluster of yellow and burgundy blooms. Flowering starts once the plant is mature, usually when the vines are around 2m in length. It requires a sunny to partially shaded position.

H. magnifica – This species develops scented clusters of white, star-shaped flowers from late winter and throughout summer. The green foliage is large, elongated and fuzzy to the touch. It will grow best in a partly shaded position.

H. multiflora ‘Shooting Stars’ – This species features unique blooms, forming clusters of yellow and white elongated flowers which are maroon at the tips. The leaves are green and elongated. It prefers a partly shaded position.

H. pubicalyx ‘Royal Hawaiian Purple’ – This species features deep green, elongated foliage which is mottled with white markings and turns purple-red when grown in the sun. The clusters of flowers can come out as pink to purple to almost black. It prefers a full to partly shaded position and will tolerate short periods of frost.


 Kalanchoe

Kalanchoe is a genus of around 135 succulent species, displaying a variety of different growth habits, colours, shapes and sizes. Listed below are some of the more common varieties:

K. beharensis – This species is sometimes known as ‘Elephant’s Ear’ or ‘Felt Bush’, displaying large, elongated, triangle foliage with undulating edges. The leaf colour is blue-grey to olive green with a covering of felt-like brown hairs. It prefers a full sun to partly shaded position and will need protection from frost. Branched flower spikes of yellow-green flowers appear in winter on mature plants.

K. blossfeldiana – This compact species typically grows less than 30cm x 30cm, preferring a full sun to partly shaded position. Eye-catching bunches of flowers can be singles or doubles and come up predominantly in winter, available in red, purple/mauve, yellow, white, pinks and oranges.

K. fedtschenkoi – This shrubby species features oval, somewhat serrated leaves which are blue-grey with seasonal blushes of pink. Red-orange and pink flowers appear on stems during winter and early spring. It will grow in full sun to part shade, needing protection from the hot afternoon sun.

K. hildebrandtii – Commonly sold as ‘Silver Spoons’, this shrubby succulent forms smooth, silver, oval shaped leaves. Orange flowers form on branching stems in winter. It prefers a full sun to partly shaded position.

K. luciae – Often mistakenly sold as the similar looking K. thyrsiflora, this species is commonly known as ‘Paddle Plant’ or ‘Flapjacks’ due to the rounded, flat leaves it displays. The foliage is blue-green at the centre, becoming a vibrant bronze-red towards the tips. Yellow blooms form on spikes with maturity. It grows best in full sun to part shade, with protection from the hot afternoon sun.

K. marmorata – Commonly known as the ‘Pen Wiper Plant’, this species features flat, rounded, lightly serrated, blue-grey foliage with deep burgundy spots. It prefers a full sun to partially shaded position with protection from frost. Spikes of white flowers appear in winter and spring.

K. ‘Medusa’ – This cultivar features large, serrated leaves which are dark green to burgundy in colour. It prefers a full sun to partly shaded position.

K. ‘Pixiebells’ – This compact, trailing cultivar looks magnificent in a hanging pot, forming masses of coral red, bell-shaped flowers during spring. The foliage is round and glossy, dark green. It grows well in a full sun to mostly shaded position.

K. pumila – This low growing groundcover succulent does well in any situation, including hanging pots where it will trail over the sides. It features rounded, somewhat serrated leaves which are silver-grey and covered in a soft fuzz. Lavender pink flower clusters appear on short spikes during winter and spring. It grows best in a sunny or partly shaded position.

K. ‘Queen’ varieties – This brand of cultivars develop beautiful, long lasting clusters of flowers atop flower spikes which are close to the deep green foliage. Flower colours can be red, purple/mauve, yellow, white, pinks and oranges. They prefer a full sun to partly shaded position. For more information visit www.queen.dk.

K. tomentosa – Often referred to as ‘Panda Plant’ or ‘Pussy’s ears’, this species is the parent to a handful of cultivars, all featuring a covering of hair-like fuzz and requiring a sunny or partly shaded position. Flowers are red and appear in winter. The original species has silver leaves with dark brown markings along the toothed margins, however other cultivars display colourings of brown, rosy pink, amber and pale green.


Lithops

Commonly known as ‘Living Stones’, these succulents get their name from their stone-like appearance, which they have developed as a defence mechanism against being consumed by wildlife in their natural environment. They are translucent at the top to allow sunlight into the plant, as they typically grow beneath a surface of sand in nature. Individual plants appear as two succulent leaves which are gently fused together. During winter, a new set of leaves form within the shelter of the two existing leaves, which part in spring and die off, revealing the new leaf pair. Yellow or white flowers appear from the centre of the leaves during late summer and autumn. They prefer a sunny or partly shaded position, with protection from the hot afternoon sun.


Mesembryanthemum

succulent planted

Popularly known as ‘Pigface’, this groundcover succulent typically sprawls for around 80cm and is often used in difficult areas because it is tolerant of drought, salinity, sand, wind and sun. It forms a dense mat of elongated green or grey-green leaves and puts on a magnificent display of flowers which can be red, pink, purple/mauve, yellow or white. The flowers appear predominantly in spring and open wide in the sunshine and close up at night. It prefers a full sun position but will also tolerate partial shade.


Pachyphytum

Pachyphytum are sometimes referred to as ‘Moonstones’, particularly P. compactum, which is a small growing species which forms thick, pointed foliage with powdery white markings over a deep purple coloured leaf, becoming green over time. They prefer a sunny to partly shaded position with protection from the hot afternoon sun.


Portulacaria

Portulacaria afra is a common succulent known as ‘Jade’ or the ‘Money Tree’. It has small, round, jade green leaves which contrast against the brown stems. When left to grow, this species becomes a large, dense shrub. It is also popular as a bonsai specimen, proving the versatile nature of the plant. A full sun to partly shaded position is preferred. Small pink flowers appear in late winter and spring. Portulacaria afra variegata is the variegated form.


Sansevieria

S. hahnii – Often sold as a ‘Bird’s Nest’ form, this species forms low growing rosettes of upright, pointed green leaves with lighter green horizontal markings. It prefers a full shade position. It is also available in a selection of variegated forms, featuring yellow margins.

S. trifasciata – Popularly known as ‘Mother-In-Law’s Tongue’ or ‘Snake Plant’, this plant displays long, pointed, upright foliage, forming around a basal rosette. The leaves are dark green with lighter green horizontal markings. The variegated version, S. trifasciata laurentii, is more common, which has thick, yellow margins. An inconspicuous yellow-green flower occasionally develops between the leaves. These plants prefer a full to partly shaded position.

S. superba – This species features the variegated colouring of S. trifasciata laurentii, the wider leaves of S. hahnii, and falls just short of the height of S. trifasciata. It prefers a fully shaded position.

S. trifasciata ‘Moonshine’ – Sometimes known as the ‘Silver Snake Plant’, this variety shows faint green horizontal markings but is mostly silver green. The leaves are pointed, long and upright. It prefers a fully shaded position.


Sedum

Sedum is a large genus of around 600 succulent species, all displaying differences in colouring, shape, size, growth habit and growing requirements. Listed below are some of the more commonly found varieties:

S. albiflora – This low growing species features rounded leaves which are green in the centre and a bright, deep red around the margins. It grows best in a full sun to partly shaded position.

S. ‘Blue Feather’ – This groundcover cultivar displays tightly packed, short, slim leaves which are blue and feather-like in overall appearance. It typically grows approximately 5cm in height and 40cm wide. It prefers a full sun to partly shaded position.

S. ‘Bronze Delight’ – This low growing cultivar typically grows to around 10cm in height and 20cm wide and features pink-bronze rosettes on stems. Pale yellow, star-shaped flowers appear periodically. It grows in full sun or part shade.

S. makinoi ‘Ogon’ – This groundcover cultivar displays vibrant, yellow-green foliage which trails over the edges of pots and looks effective in rockeries. It prefers a sunny to partly shaded position with protection from the hot afternoon sun to avoid bleaching. Yellow flowers develop in the middle of summer.

S. mexicanum – Usually sold as ‘Gold Mound’, this groundcover succulent features golden to lime green feather-like foliage and prefers a sunny to partly shaded position. It can spread up to 60cm and looks effective in a hanging pot and in rockeries. Masses of yellow flowers appear in spring.

S. morganianum – Popularly known as ‘Burro’s Tail’, ‘Donkey Tail’ or the compact variety ‘Burrito’, this species produces trailing stems of fleshy, blue-green leaves and looks effective in a hanging pot. Pink flowers appear in summer. It prefers a sunny to partly shaded position with protection from the hot afternoon sun.

S. pachyphyllum – Commonly known as ‘Blue Jelly Beans’, this species displays rounded, glossy, jelly-bean like leaves which are blue-green in colour, often developing a pink hue at the tips. They prefer a full sun to partly shaded position and develop yellow flowers during the summer.

S. rubrotinctum – Commonly known as ‘Red Jelly Beans’ or ‘Pork and Beans’, this species displays rounded, glossy, jelly-bean like leaves which are green with red tips, particularly vibrant when grown in the sun. They prefer a full sun to partly shaded position and develop yellow flowers during spring.

S. rubrotinctum aurora – Commonly known as ‘Pink Jelly Beans’, this species displays rounded, glossy, jelly-bean like leaves which are pale green with pink tips, particularly vibrant during winter. They prefer a full sun to partly shaded position and develop yellow flowers during spring.

S. spathulifolium – Available in cultivars ‘Silver Blob’ and ‘Cape Blanco’, this groundcover succulent displays silver grey foliage, which forms a dense mat of small rosettes on short stems. Yellow flowers appear in summer. It prefers a full sun to partly shaded position.

S. spathulifolium purpureum ‘Purple Blob’ – This groundcover cultivar displays blue-green to purple foliage, which forms a dense mat of small rosettes on short stems. It prefers a full sun to partly shaded position, with protection from the hot afternoon sun.

S. spectabile ‘Autumn Joy’ – This cultivar features blue-green foliage and is known for the spectacular floral display it puts on starting from summer, when broccoli-like flower buds form on stems above the plant. These buds open into brilliant pink flowers, which become a deep red closer to winter. It prefers a full sun or partly shaded position.

 


Sempervivum

succulents

With around 50 species and thousands of cultivars, Sempervivum have become a popular plant for succulent collectors, with a huge variety of colours and growth habits. They are all comprised of offsetting rosettes and often form clumps. The common name for these plants is ‘House Leeks’. Listed below are some of the more commonly found varieties:

S. tectorum syn. Alpinum – this rosette forming evergreen perennial displays thick grey-green foliage and forms clusters of red-purple flowers on tall shoots in summer. Extremely drought resistant and prefers full sun but can tolerate some light shade.

S. tectorum ‘Oddity’ – Evergreen succulent displaying bright green, dense clustering leaves. Similar to S. tectorum, but the leaves of ‘Oddity’ fold around to create small hollow tubes. Rosettes are roughly 10cm in diameter, with star shaped, red-purple flowers forming on upright stems in summer. The plant will dies off after flowers but is quickly replaced by offshoots. Cold tolerant, full sun to part shade in hotter climates.

S. calcareum – This species forms large rosettes of 15-20cm displaying blue green leaves with red tips. Prefers full sun with some afternoon shade in hotter areas.

S. montanum (Dwarf) – Small succulent forming clustered rosettes to 5-8cm diameter. Mid green, fleshy leaves typical to Sempervivum, with star shaped red-purple flower forming on stalks in early summer, after which the mother plant will die off. Suitable for sun to light shade in hotter areas, cold tolerant.

S. arachnoideum rubrum – Commonly known as ‘Red Cobweb Hens and Chicks’, this plant produces very small clustered rosettes with grey green leaves, showing a flush of red in spring. Will spread to form a dense mat with pink to red flowers forming in summer, when the plant will die off. Prefers sun to part shade in hotter areas, and is drought tolerant.

S. arachnoideum -Commonly known as ‘Cobweb House Leek’, this species forms small, clustered, grey-green coloured rosettes which are covered in silvery cobweb-like filaments. Pink flowers form in clusters on stems over summer, when the plant will die off. Grows well in full sun and prefers well drained sandy soils.

S. wulfenii – Rosette forming species with blue-green leaves. Reaches 3-6cm in diameter, and will form a fleshy stem bearing yellow star shaped flowers in summer to autumn, followed by the mother plant dying off. Forms mats up to 30cm across. Prefers full sun to some light shade in hotter areas.

S. italicum

S. ‘Weirdo’ – Medium sized rosettes formed of narrow, yellow-green leaves with flushed red tips.

S. heuffelii – Commonly known as ‘Purple Haze’, this perennial succulent forms rosettes of 3-10cm. The leaves are green, grading to red or brown at the tips. Forms a fleshy stem bearing yellow-white flowers and will die off after flowering. Prefers full sun to some shade in hotter areas.


Senecio

One of the largest genus of flowering plants, Senecio contains over 1200 species. This genera is distributed globally, and species can vary in their habit and growing requirements. Listed below are some of the more commonly found varieties:

S. rowleyanus (String of Pearls) – Commonly known as ‘String of Pearls’, the succulent produces round pea-like leaves on thin, trailing stems. Can produce small white flowers in spring to summer. Prefers a sheltered positon with little direct sunlight, and does well when placed indoors.

S. mandraliscae – Commonly known as ‘Blue Chalk Sticks’ or ‘Blue Finger’, this species produces blue-grey finger shaped leaves, forming a groundcover mat with leaves pointing upwards from the ground. Will form yellow flower on stalks in summer. Prefers full sun to part shade.

S. serpens – Commonly known as ‘Dwarf Blue Chalk Sticks’, forms a more compact groundcover mat then Senecio mandraliscae, but with many of the same characteristics. Small finger shaped blue-grey leaves point up from the ground and forms white flowers on stalks in summer. Prefers full sun.

S. haworthii – Commonly known as ‘Woolly Senecio’, this perennial dwarf shrub displays densely felted, light grey-pale blue succulent leaves. Yellow flowers are produced on clusters. Drought tolerant and prefers full sun to part shade.

S. scaposus – Commonly known as ‘Silver Coral’, this species forms finger shaped grey-silver succulent leaves, angling upwards in clusters. Yellow flowers are produced in groups on stems over summer. Prefers full sun to part shade in hotter areas.

S. articulatus – Commonly known as ‘Candle Plant’, this species reaches 40-60cm in height, with pale green succulent stems and flat green/purple leaves forming only about 50% of the time. This species is dormant in summer, only actively growing throughout winter. Can produce small white cup like flowers. Prefers full sun to part shade and is suitable for indoors.


Stapelia

With flowers that smell of rotting meat, it’s easy to see how many species of Stapelia have gotten the common name ‘Carrion Flower’. With 50 species of clump forming succulents, this genus is often grown by collectors for their unique appearance and scent, which has been developed to attract flies as pollinators.

 

 

Bare Root Rose

Winter is a great time for planting. Getting plants in the ground at this time of year gives roses plenty of time to establish before the hot summer and the long awaited bare rooted plants are available. During winter, rose that have been field grown are dug up when they’re dormant, and sold, ready for planting. Bare-rooted roses are only available in winter – June, July and August. With so many new varieties of bare root rose available, there is no excuse not to get planting.

See Heynes list for varieties of Rose.

When selecting a bare rooted plant, try to ensure there is no obvious physical damage and look for a good, even structure and also look for good strong graft. Don’t leave the rose sitting round for extended period of time, and remember the roots of these plants need to stay moist from the point when dug out of the ground until planting time. If not planting straight away make sure to keep them moist, not wet.It is most important to NEVER allow the roots to become dry. In Australian bare root rose should be planted over the June to September months and should be in the ground by the time rose bring to “shoot”.

 

PLANTING BARE ROOT ROSES

Roses like to be planted in a sunny, open aspect and the soil needs to have good drainage. So select a location where they’ll receive at least six hours of sun and have good drainage.

Prune

At planting time it is recommend to prune, because when the rose are dug, the roots are pruned, and for a balanced tree the tops should be pruned to balance the root size. Prune new roses back by one-third in an even manner to an outwards facing bud, make cuts on a sight angle, and use clean secateurs.  Also remove any dead or broken wood.

Dig

Dig a hole around twice as wide as the root ball. To allow the rose roots to spread the inside of the hole should have nice, rough edges, to ensure the effective movement of water and air. Thoroughly mix the soil from the hole with plenty of gypsum and some SA compost, then put a good shovel of gypsum into the bottom of the hole and fork in through.

Plant

Unpack the bare root rose, remove all packing materials, and carefully untangle the roots. If in sawdust carefully remove most of it. Before planting remove any diseased, or damaged roots.  

Set the rose in the hole and spread the roots out in a natural position. It can help to mound a pile of soil at the base to support the root system. Position the rose so the bud union is above the soil level, its best to plant the rose at the same level as when it was originally in the ground. Back fill the hole, lightly firm the soil, make a well around the base and water in. Also it’s very important to stake standard roses.

Water/Fertilise

Water as needed however do not overwater. Now that bare root roses are in the ground it is important to remember that over watering and mulching roses at this early time will set them back. The soil around the rose should be kept moist but not soggy.

Consistent watering is important in the dry months (summer). Before watering, check the soil if it’s damp, it will be fine.

No need to fertilise until the rose starts growing in spring. (If you feel inclined to, add a small amount of fertilise at time of planting). When summer arrives it is recommend to mulch. 

Cactus

 

Astrophytum

IMG 8899rCommonly recognised for the species’ known as Bishop’s Cap (such as Astrophytum myriostigma), Astrophytum are a slow-growing cactus with pink, white or yellow flowers protruding from the apex of the plant during spring-summer.


Cleistocactus

The Silver Torch cactus (also known as Woolly Torch), or Cleistocactus strausii, is a clumping, frost tolerant cactus of grey/white columns, which usually grow to approximately 1.5m in a domestic environment. Red flowers protrude horizontally from the mature columns during summer.


Echinocactus

The popularly known Golden Barrel, or Echinocactus grusonii, is a hardy, globose cactus which can reach approximately 1m. This cactus may or may not clump depending on environmental factors. Yellow flowers form around the crown of mature plants during summer.


Echinocereus

Echinocereus knippelianus is a soft, plump, clumping cactus which has pink flowers from the apex of the plant in spring and summer. It is small (approximately 10cm), usually round in shape and can tolerate both sun and frost.


 

IMG 8908rEchinopsis (Syn. Lobivia, Trichocereus)

E. arachnacantha – Small, abundantly clumping cactus with showy flowers of red, yellow, orange, white or pink during spring-summer. This species requires protection from full sun and frost.

E. subdenudata – A rarely clumping, small spined species which will usually reach approximately 30cm in height. Very large white blooms on long tubes appear through spring-summer.

E. scopulicola – A columnar species with very small spines. Mature plants form large white flowers in summer.


 

Espostoa
IMG 9203r

The Peruvian Old Man Cactus, or Espostoa melanostele, is a tall (typically less than 2m), clumping species with woolly, grey-white columns. This plant will tolerate a full sun position once acclimatised.


Ferocactus

Ferocactus wislizeni, also known as the Fishhook Cactus or Arizona Barrel Cactus, has thick, hooked spines and yellow to red-orange flowers during summer. This cactus will tolerate full sun to part shade and is tolerant of frost.


Gymnocalycium

G. baldianum – The Chin Cactus is a small, flat-globose cactus with short stemmed flowers forming on the crown. Flowers can be magenta, pink, red, orange or white and form in early summer.

G. mihanovichii – Known as the Chin Cactus or Moon Cactus, this species is commonly grown as a grafted ornamental plant. The brightly coloured cacti (yellow, orange, pink, red or purple) lack chlorophyll and are grafted onto another plant to survive, typically Hylocereus (Dragonfruit). This species prefers a warm position; however it can be harmed by the full hot sun. Flowers appear in summer.


 

Hatiora (Syn. Rhipsalidopsis)IMG 8914r

Hatiora gaertneri and related hybrids are commonly known as the Easter Cactus or Spring Cactus as they typically form star-like flowers in spring. They are suitable for hanging baskets and thrive in a bright position.


Isolatocereus

Isolatocereus dumortieri, or Candelabra Cactus, is a sun hardy, columnar, branching cactus with white flowers which open at night. This plant will grow up to 15m in nature.


Mammillaria

There are currently around 200 known species of Mammillaria, making the genus one of the largest in the cactus family. An attractive quality of this genus is the ring of petite flowers which form around the crown in most species.  Listed below are some of the more commonly found Mammillaria:

M. albilanata – Usually solitary species, with a cylindrical habit, short spines and some wooliness. This cactus will grow in the full hot sun to partial shade. A ring of pink, magenta or red flowers form in summer.

M. bocasana – A small, clustering, woolly species known as the Powder Puff, Pincushion or Snowball Cactus. Flowers range from cream to pink.

IMG 9259rM. bombycina – Known as the Silken Pincushion, this species can be solitary or clumping and has hooked reddish-brown spines. It is globose in shape and flowers of pink or white form in spring. Full sun to part shade is preferable, with a light frost tolerance.

M. celsiana – The Golden Pincushion is a globose cactus with gold radial spines and woolly areoles. It requires a well-lit position and protection from frost. Rings of small carmine flowers form in spring.

M. elongata – The Lady Finger Cactus is a small (usually 15cm or less) species with densely packed clusters of elongated oval stems, which requires full sun to part shade. Spring flowers are cream to yellow.

M. elongata cristata – Often referred to as the Brain Cactus because of its brain-like appearance, this cactus will form white, yellow or pink flowers in summer and requires full sun to part shade. The undulating, wavy crests eventually grow into a mass around 30cm.

IMG 9212rM. gracilis fragilis – The Arizona Snowcap is a petite, prolifically branching, cylindrical speciesdensely covered with white radial spines. It prefers a well-lit position and protection from frost. Cream coloured flowers can form for most of the year but are most common in late summer to early autumn.

M. haageana elegans – Usually solitary but clustering with age, this cactus forms dark pink flowers in spring and tolerates full sun to part shade.

M. hahniana – The woolly Old Lady Cactus grows around 25cm tall, with a solitary, globose, slightly squat habit. It prefers a warm position of full sun to part shade and forms a ring of dark pink flowers in spring, summer and sometimes winter.

M. marksiana – A flattened globose species with bright yellow flowers in late winter and spring. It prefers a sunny position.

IMG 9221rM. matudae – A cylindrical species known as the Thumb Cactus which forms clusters with age, usually around 10-20cm in height. It prefers full sun to part shade and protection from frost. Dark pink flowers form in late spring to early summer. 

M. microhelia – A small (usually around 15cm), columnar cactus which can be solitary or clumping. Flowers appear in spring and can be white, cream, yellow, pink, magenta or red.

M. spinosissima – Commonly available in the cultivar Pico, this ovate species features distinctively long, white, delicate, single spines. It typically reaches around 15cm in height and produces dark pink flowers in spring.

M. zeilmanniana – The Rose Pincushion usually reaches a height of around 15cm and prefers a sunny position, however protection from the hot afternoon sun is ideal, as well as protection from frost. Young plants are solitary but will clump with age. Pink flowers form in summer.


 

MammilloydiaIMG 9239r

Mammilloydia candida is a globose cactus which can become cylindrical with age and can eventually reach 30cm in height. The short, white spines and woolly appearance have earned this species the common name Snowball Cactus. Flowers are pink or pinkish-white and form around late winter and well into spring.


Melocactus

Melocactus azureus, commonly known as Blue Turk’s Cap, is a blue-grey, globose species. Mature plants develop a cephalium, which is a dense mass of wool that forms a cap on the apex of the cactus. Once this cap forms, the main stem stops growing, but the cephalium will continue to grow.


Myrtillocactus

Myrtillocactus geometrizans is a blue, branching, columnar cactus known as the Blue Torch which can grow up to 4.5m in nature. This plant can burn in the full sun when young, but will take the sun later into maturity.


 

OreocereusIMG 9226r

Oreocereus celsianus, commonly named Old Man of the Andes or Old Man of the Mountain, is a columnar cactus with distinctively long, silky white hairs which help to protect the plant from intense sunlight and heat. Red tubular flowers form in spring on mature plants.


Parodia (Syn. Notocactus, Eriocactus)

P. leninghausii – The Golden Torch is a columnar cactus with delicate golden spines. It grows to approximately 1m tall and is tolerant of heat and frost. Yellow flowers are produced in spring to late summer.

P. magnifica – The Balloon Cactus (sometimes known as the Ball Cactus) requires full sun to part shade and protection from frost. Yellow flowers form near the apex at any time of the year but mostly through summer.

IMG 9210rP. ottonis – The Indian Head cactus is a globose cactus which can reach approximately 30cm tall and requires light shade. Yellow flowers are produced in late spring to early summer.

P. submammulosa – A solitary, globose cactus with a squat apex. This species is both frost and heat tolerant and prefers full sun to part shade. Yellow flowers form in spring and summer.

P. werneri – Still commonly sold under the synonym Notocactus uebelmannianus, this small (usually around 15cm) and slightly squat, globose cactus is usually solitary with a glossy green body. It prefers a warm, sunny position but will need protection from the full hot sun in summer. Pink or magenta flowers form in spring and early summer around the apex.


Pilocereus

Pilocereus azureus is a blue, columnar cactus with yellow spines commonly named the Blue Torch. This plant prefers a warm, full sun position or partial shade and will need protection from frost. White flowers appear in summer.


Rebutia (Syn. Sulcorebutia)

IMG 9219r

R. albiflora – A small, profusely clumping cactus covered with delicate, white, hair-like spines. Flower buds are pink which open into white flowers in spring. This species will need protection from the hot summer sun.

R. fabrisii – A compact, heavily clumping cactus with red flowers forming in spring. This species prefers a well-lit position.

R. fabrisii v. aureiflora – A compact, heavily clumping cactus which forms a mound up to 30cm tall. It requires a sunny to part shade position, however it will need protection from the hot summer sun. Yellow flowers appear in spring.

R. pulvinosa – A compact, heavily clumping cactus with bright orange flowers which form in spring. This plant grows best in part shade, as it can be easily scorched by the full sun.

R. heliosa var cajasensis – A clumping cactus which prefers a well-lit position but will also tolerate light shade. Red flowers form profusely in spring


 

RhipsalisIMG 9236r

R. baccifera – Commonly known as the Mistletoe Cactus, this species does best in shade to part-shade and will need protection from frost. Typically planted into hanging baskets, this trailing cactus can form slender stems up to 1.8m long.

R. houlletiana – Typically planted into hanging baskets, this trailing cactus forms thin, wide stems up to 1.8m long and does best in part to full shade. Pale yellow or white flowers form in spring to early summer.

R. paradoxa – The Chain Cactus is a trailing species suited to hanging baskets in a shade or part shade situation. Small, white flowers bloom in late winter to early spring.

R. pilocarpa – Tolerating full sun to partial shade, this trailing cactus is suited to hanging baskets. The higher tolerance to sun compared to the other Rhipsalis species is due to a covering of soft, white hairs. White flowers form at the tips of the stems in autumn to early winter.

R. teres syn. Capilliformis – Sometimes known as Old Man’s Beard or Link Cactus, this trailing species requires full to light shade and is suited to hanging baskets. White flowers form at the tips in late summer, autumn and winter.


Schlumbergera (Syn. Zygocactus, Epiphyllum)

P2091012r

Known commonly as the Christmas Cactus, Thanksgiving Cactus, Holiday Cactus or Crab Cactus, Schlumbergera prefer a lightly shaded but warm position and are suited to hanging baskets. Spectacular flowers form at the tips of the thick, flat stems in winter.


Stenocactus/Echinofossulocactus

Stenocactus multicostatus is a small (usually 15cm or less), usually solitary, globose cactus with multiple thin, wavy ribs and flattened spines. Flowers are white or pink and form in spring and summer.


Stenocereus

Stenocereus pruinosus is a columnar cactus known as the Grey Organ Pipe or Grey Ghost Organ Pipe. This species will accept full sun once acclimatised and will need protection from frost.


Thelocactus/Hamatocactus

Thelocactusrinconensis ssp.freudenbergeri is a usually solitary, depressed or globose cactus which usually reaches approximately 10cm in height and has long, thin spines. Magenta flowers form in spring. 

 

 

Shrubs

Under construction at present

Shrubs are a must for any garden, providing year round color and structure to the garden. Shrubs can be added to mixed borders or used as hedging or to create privacy.

Heynes offer a wide selection of evergreen and deciduous shrubs to brighten up any garden all year round.From low growing to large growing shrubs, which are available in range of sizes from 140mm pots up to large advance specimens.

Full Sun, Partial Shade, Full Shade there is a shrub for you, so come in and see our range. If we don’t have what you’re looking for feel free to ask us if we can source it for you.

 

Please check for seasonality and availability of Shrubs variety by giving us a call, e-mailing or visiting the Nursery.

Potted Colour

potted colour 1picture 7Potted colour is great way to add that splash of annual colour to brighten any spot in the garden.

Flowering annuals can be planted in pots, baskets or window boxes, or add amongst existing shrubs or used as a border to define and brighten the garden.

There are varieties of plants for all seasons and all aspects, from full sun to shade, short ones, tall ones or trailing. It’s possibly to find something wonderfully colourful, no matter what time of year as some potted colour flower in spring, some in summer, some in autumn and some in winter. The choice is yours come in as see Heynes range of colour.

Indoor plants

Please check for seasonality and availability of indoor plants variety by giving us a call, e-mailing or visiting the Nursery.

It’s time to bring the garden inside. Just as an outdoor garden creates a sense of peace, growing plants indoors can helps us to relax, just one plant per room can help purify the air.

With a huge selection of house plants available, planter boxes or large pots can be planted out with indoor plants of different growth, leaf shapes and sizes.  There is an immense range of colourful indoor foliage plants available to choose. A dull, dark corner with a skylight or artificial lighting can be turned into a miniature jungle with the right type of indoor plants. Try unusual foliage shapes, straight lines, and easy-care plants like Zanzibar Gem, Bromeliads and Sansevieria. 

indoor1
indoor2
indoor3

 

When creating a garden indoors, think about the plants that will suit the interior style. Why not try big, bold indoor plants that create impact. Plants with textural foliage and sculptural shape such as the Dracaena marginate, lady palm or golden cane palm. Shade loving plants like Impatiens, Begonias, and even cyclamen make good temporary substitutes for cut flowers. They are a great way to bring some flowers in.

It’s time to bring back indoor plants.

 

indoor4

 

Remember there is no such thing as an indoor plant in nature, only plants that will survive growing indoors. So make sure to look after them and don’t just neglect them.

Hedge and Screens

 Under construction at present

Hedges and screens can be used to create privacy or to screen out unwanted views. But they have many other uses, block out unwanted winds or the heat of the western sun, they can also be used to divide up the garden into areas and provide structure to the garden.Although most hedges are thought of as clipped and formal in appearance, they can be shaped in a loose informal way, but still provide that much needed screen.

Heynes offer a selection of shrubs and screened plants for full sun to part shade to full shade. From low growing too tall growing, which are available in range of sizes.

Most hedges need to be a certain height to fulfil a role in a garden, therefore the easiest way to look and choose a hedge is to group them according to their growth heights. Larger growing plants can certainty be pruned/trimmed to any size, but keeping them small takes more work, then selecting one that will naturally grow the desired height.

Here is a selection of some of the hedging plants according to their full height that Heynes stock. If we don’t have what you’re looking for feel free to ask us if we can source it for you.

 

Hedge011m and Below

Abeliaxgrandiflora’Nana’
Euonymus sp, Green Rocket, Easy Hedge or Tom Thumb
Syzygium smithii var. minor ‘Allyn Magic’ Lilly Pilly
Syzygium australe Dwarf ‘Tiny Trev’ Lilly Plly

1m to 2m
Buxus microphylla, Japanese Box
Buxus sempervirens, English Box
Buxus microphylla ‘koreana’   Korean Box
Syzygium australe ‘Bush Christmas’ Lilly Pilly
Syzigium australe ‘Winter Lights’ Lilly Pilly

 

 

 

 

Hedge022m to 3m

Abelia grandiflora
Acmena smithii var.minor ‘Cherry Surprise’ Lilly Pilly
Choisyaternate, MexicanOrange/Mock Orange
Murraya paniculata, Orange Jessamine
Pittosporum tenuifolium, ‘Sliver Sheen’
Viburnum tinus ‘laurustinus’ or ‘Lucidum’
Viburnum Suspensum, Sandanqua Viburnum
Viburnum odoratissimum,Sweet Viburnum 

 

Hedge033m and Above

Photinia x fraseri ‘Red Robin’ or ‘Robusta’
Pittosporum tenuifolium ‘Screenmaster’ or ‘Variegated Sreenmaster’
Acmena smithii ‘Goodbye Neighbours’ Lilly Pilly
Syzygium australe ‘Big Red’ Lilly Pilly

 

 

Please check for seasonality and availability of Hedges variety by giving us a call, e-mailing or visiting the Nursery.

Ground cover

This page is under construction at present

GroundCover01

Ground covers play a big part in our environment. Whether they’re low and sleek or tall and bushy, groundcover plants do what they say. They cover the ground, help control weeds, conserve moisture in the ground, stop erosion of the soils and brighten up the garden. Making them perfect for covering large area or creating a dramatic planting effect. Ground covers come in many shapes and sizes. Ground cover plants grown outwards not upwards, some grow to around 50cm or so, other will lie low and hug the ground.

There are ground covers for Full Sun, Partial Shade, and Full shade, so come in and see our range. If we don’t have what you’re looking for feel free to ask us if we can source it for you.

 

Please check for seasonality and availability of Ground Cover variety by giving us a call, e-mailing or visiting the Nursery.